News

  • Hatch Act, DOD regulations govern political activities

    Department of the Army civilians must adhere to the Hatch Act, which is a law intended to assure the public that federal programs are being administered fairly and without the influence of partisan politics. In the same manner as the Hatch Act, military members are under the DOD Directive 1344.10, “Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty.”

    By Samantha Hill

    REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala.—With 2020 being an election year, Soldiers and Department of the Army civilians must remember laws and directives outlining what can and can’t be done when it comes to political support — including what is done online and during telework hours.
    Department of the Army civilians must adhere to the Hatch Act, which is a law intended to assure the public that federal programs are being administered fairly and without the influence of partisan politics.
    “It also serves to shield federal employees from partisan political coercion and political influence in personnel decisions,” said Larry Wilde, an ethics counselor at Army Materiel Command. “In large part because of the Hatch Act, personnel decisions are based on merit, not patronage or political affiliation.”
    In the same manner as the Hatch Act, military members are under the DOD Directive 1344.10, “Political Activities by Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty.” Both help avoid the perception of official DOD sponsorship, approval or endorsement of any partisan political candidate, campaign or cause. Read More



Sports

  • #11 Rifle sets program record, but Falls to #2 Kentucky

    The 11th-ranked Army West Point rifle team set a program record with an aggregate mark of 4,682 in its season-opener on Saturday. Despite the program feat, the Black Knights fell to Great America Rifle Conference (GARC) foe No. 2 Kentucky, which shot a score of 4,709. Army shot its portion of the match virtually in the Tronsrue Marksmanship Center, while Kentucky competed at their own range in Lexington, Ky.

    By JJ Klein
    Army Athletic Communications

    The 11th-ranked Army West Point rifle team set a program record with an aggregate mark of 4,682 in its season-opener on Saturday. Despite the program feat, the Black Knights fell to Great America Rifle Conference (GARC) foe No. 2 Kentucky, which shot a score of 4,709.
    Army shot its portion of the match virtually in the Tronsrue Marksmanship Center, while Kentucky competed at their own range in Lexington, Kentucky.
    “This is a weird situation to be in,” said Army head coach Web Wright. “We set a program record, but I was expecting a higher score based on the performances we’ve seen over the last couple of weeks.”
    All of Army’s scorers in smallbore had marks above 577. Read More



Leisure

  • USMA reaccreditation visit scheduled for end of September

    Almost 80 members of the USMA staff and faculty have participated in working groups that have evaluated whether the academy meets the standards set forth by its institutional accreditor, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE).

    By Jon Malinowski
    Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering professor

    Between Sept. 27-30, the U.S. Military Academy will host a seven-member team for a virtual reaccreditation evaluation visit. Led by the Superintendent of the U.S. Air Force Academy, Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, this team of peer reviewers will conduct interviews and focus groups with various constituencies within the USMA community.
    The evaluation team’s itinerary includes a session that is open to all USMA personnel, which will be held from 12:15-1:15 p.m. Sept. 29. The visit will conclude on Sept. 30 when the evaluation team presents its initial findings in a virtual address to the community from 10-11 a.m.
    This visit is an important milestone in an effort that has been underway at West Point for more than three years. Read More



Extra!

  • The Dean’s Book Club: “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”

     Dean of the Academic Board Brig. Gen. Cindy Jebb hosted her first session of the “Dean’s Book Club” at the West Point Club, Oct. 6. From Oct. 6 -23, participants have the opportunity to read and discuss “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot.

    The U.S. Military Academy’s Dean of the Academic Board Brig. Gen. Cindy Jebb hosted her first session of the “Dean’s Book Club” at the West Point Club, Oct. 6.

    From Oct. 6-23, participants have the opportunity to read and discuss “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot.

    The book delves into the impact that Henrietta Lacks’ cells, known around the world as “HeLa cells,” have had in science throughout the last 60-plus years, as well as the ethical and scientific implications of human cell research.

    “The history of Henrietta Lacks and the HeLa cells raises important issues regarding science, ethics, race and class,” Skloot says in the introduction of her book. “I’ve done my best to present them clearly within the narrative of the Lacks story… There is much more to say on all the issues, but that is beyond the scope of this book, so I will leave it for the scholars and experts in the field to address.”

    The Dean’s Book Club consists of three sessions—each of which highlights a different interdisciplinary topic that is discussed in the book. Read More



 

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