In Memoriam

  • Fallen Cadet honored at Fort Hood memorial ceremony

    FORT HOOD, Texas—Hundreds of family, friends, comrades and supporters attended a memorial held for Class of 2018 Cadet Mitchell Alexander Winey, 21, at the Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel June 9.

    Winey, of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was one of nine victims of the flood waters that took his life and the lives of eight Soldiers while conducting convoy operations with 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, June 2.

    “We are here on a solemn day, to pay tribute to a fallen comrade,” Maj. Gen. J.T. Thomson III, 1st Cav. Div. commanding general, said. “Today’s ceremony allows Mitch’s fellow cadets to honor him.

    “To Mitch’s family,” he added, “thank you for being here, and more so, thank you for allowing Mitch to serve our nation.”

    Winey’s memorial was held ahead of the other eight fallen at Fort Hood, because the cadets are heading back to New York June 11. Read More

  • Cadet dies during training accident

    WEST POINT, N.Y.—U.S. Military Academy Cadet Mitchell A. Winey, a member of the Class of 2018, from Chesterton, Indiana, died along with eight other Soldiers during a training accident after flood waters overturned the Light Medium Tactical Vehicle they were traveling in June 2 at Fort Hood, Texas.

    “Our continued thoughts and prayers are with the Winey family and all those who have been affected in this unfortunate accident,” Commandant of Cadets Brig. Gen. Diana Holland said. “This is a terrible loss that will be felt throughout the Army and academy communities.”

    “He internalized the ideals and values of West Point and exemplified them in all that he set out to do. Duty, Honor, Country were his touchstones,” Lt. Gen. Robert L. Read More

  • Legendary Hockey Coach Jack Riley passes away at 95

    U.S. Hockey Hall of Famer and former Army head hockey coach Jack Riley passed away Feb. 3 in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, surrounded by his family and friends. He was 95 years old.

    “Our family is saddened by the passing of our father,” current head coach Brian Riley said. “He lived a great life and although he is known as a hockey coach to many people, he was a great husband, father, grandfather and friend to all. My brothers, sister and I were especially grateful to have been able to call him dad and have had a wonderful and caring father for all these years.”

    Army’s all-time winningest coach, Jack Riley, authored a 542-343-20 record during his remarkable 36-year career at the Black Knights’ hockey helm. Read More

  • In Memoriam